Stories about: undiagnosed disease

Interpreting genomes in undiagnosed patients: Our CLARITY Challenge experience

CLARITY Undiagnosed challenge winner Peter WhitePeter White, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Biomedical Genomics Core at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, led the winning team in CLARITY Undiagnosed, an international challenge that interpreted genomic data from five families with undiagnosed conditions. The team also took part in CLARITY’s first challenge in 2012, receiving special mention. Here, White describes the team’s approach to these “toughest of the tough” patients.

The CLARITY Undiagnosed challenge was markedly harder than the first CLARITY challenge. This time around, we were given whole-genome sequence datasets for five families and asked to produce clinically useful results through improved interpretation and reporting. It turned out to be a fantastic learning experience for all of us, and we will be using the collaborative approach we developed to solve genomics challenges in our own patients.

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Two big wins for rare disease

Two new developments offer glimmers of hope to patients with rare, hard-to-diagnose conditions—validation of the power of crowd sourcing and the prospect of bringing cognitive computing to rare disease diagnosis. Both developments were announced at the Boston Children’s Hospital Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards (#PedInno15).

The crowd-sourcing challenge, CLARITY Undiagnosed, yesterday announced the findings of 21 teams that competed from seven countries. The winning team, Nationwide Children’s Hospital (Columbus, OH), was awarded $25,000. Invitae Corporation (San Francisco) and Wuxi NextCODE Genomics (Cambridge, MA) were named runners-up.

Each team received DNA sequences and clinical data from five families whose illnesses had eluded many prior diagnostic attempts—in some cases, even prior genomic sequencing.

“These were the toughest of the tough,” says Alan Beggs, PhD, co-organizer of CLARITY Undiagnosed and director of the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children’s.

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An online portal for undiagnosed patients

(Mopic/Shutterstock)
(Mopic/Shutterstock)

Prospects are looking up for patients who have no explanation for their symptoms despite extensive investigations and testing. There’s a growing revolution in DNA diagnostics (see yesterday’s example) and ongoing work to bring clarity and meaning to sequencing data. Patients with similar symptoms can find each other like never before, and are increasingly empowered to lead in research and discovery.

Another small but important development was announced yesterday by the National Institutes of Health. The NIH’s Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) has opened up a one-stop online portal called the UDN Gateway where patients and families can apply for access to expert team analysis and testing. (A referral letter from a provider is required.)

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Undiagnosed families hold on as genome competitors look for explanations

undiagnosed patients await answersThe CLARITY Undiagnosed Challenge is heating up. Biomedical teams from seven countries are racing to interpret DNA sequences from five families affected with undiagnosed illnesses—some with gravely ill children, some already bereaved, all desperate for answers.

In July, the 26 competing teams received whole-genome and whole-exome sequence data from each patient and close family members, along with clinical notes and patient videos. Their reports, due September 21, will be judged by an independent panel based on:

  • the methods used to analyze and interpret the sequence data
  • the ability to synthesize the information
  • clinical usefulness, care recommendations and “next steps.”

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When your child isn’t just rare, but probably one of a kind

Savoie at home with 4-year-old Esmé in New York.
Savoie at home with 4-year-old Esmé in New York.

Hillary Savoie, PhD, founder and director of The Cute Syndrome Foundation, is author of Around And Into The Unknown, chronicling her family’s journey to find a diagnosis for Esmé, and Whoosh, about coming to terms with Esmé’s early medical complications.

I think my daughter Esmé is extraordinarily unique—from her tiny pudgy feet that she likes to stuff in her mouth to her beautifully lashed blue eyes and outrageously untamed hair. It’s a mom thing. I guess it is a symptom of loving another person more than life itself.

But my daughter is also unusual in a more scientific way: in her genes. 

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