Stories about: vasculature

News Note: Why is this eye cancer making headlines?

This illustrations shows a catheter is used during intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma.
During intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma, a catheter is placed into the common femoral artery and threaded through a child’s vasculature to access the blood vessel of the affected eye and deliver a concentrated dose of chemotherapy. Illustration: Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s.

Retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that originates in the retina, the tissue in the back of the eye that converts light into visual information that is interpreted by the brain.

One retinoblastoma symptom in particular is finding itself in the spotlight. With a rise in social media use in recent years, retinoblastoma has attracted media attention for being a type of cancer that can sometimes be detected through photographs. Across the internet, news stories like this one abound in which friends or relatives have alerted parents to the potential risk of eye cancer after noticing that a child’s pupil appears white instead of red — a symptom called leukocoria — on photos posted to social media.

Fortunately, with proper diagnosis and treatment, 95 percent of children diagnosed with retinoblastoma can be cured. What’s more, a catheter-based treatment approach is now sparing patients from some of the side effects that can be expected from more traditional therapies.

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A “CRISPR” view of Sturge-Weber syndrome is coming into focus

Colorized laboratory image showing tissue model containing the Sturge-Weber syndrome genetic mutation
Living blood vessels inside a microfluidic chip containing the genetic mutation (green) responsible for Sturge-Weber syndrome (Credit: Bischoff lab)

Three-dimensional modeling and CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology are giving scientists a new view into Sturge-Weber syndrome, a rare congenital disorder that causes small blood vessels, called capillaries, to be malformed. These capillary malformations can cause port wine birthmarks on the face and neck, and in some cases, abnormal vasculature in the brain that can spark seizures.

Last year, a Boston Children’s Hospital research team — led by Joyce Bischoff, PhD, of the Vascular Biology Programdiscovered that the genetic mutation responsible for Sturge-Weber syndrome dwells in endothelial cells lining the affected capillaries in the brain. The team had previously found the same mutation present in the endothelial cells of skin capillaries of patients’ port wine birthmarks.

Together, their studies suggest that mutated endothelial cells could be causing surrounding cells to behave abnormally.

To explore this emerging hypothesis, Bischoff’s team is seeking lifelike ways of mimicking these hallmark capillary malformations in the laboratory.

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