Stories about: Vijay Sankaran

Discovering a rare anemia in time to save an infant’s life

Illustration of the erythropoietin hormone. A newly-discovered genetic mutation, which switches one amino acid in EPO's structure, resulted in two cases of rare anemia.
An illustration showing the structure of a cell-signaling cytokine called erythropoietin (EPO). It has long been thought that when EPO binds with its receptor, EPOR, it functions like an on/off switch, triggering red blood cell production. New findings suggest that this process is more nuanced than previously thought; even slight variations to cytokines like EPO can cause disease.

While researching a rare blood disorder called Diamond-Blackfan anemia, scientists stumbled upon an even rarer anemia caused by a previously-unknown genetic mutation. During their investigation, the team of scientists — from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and Yale University — had the relatively unusual opportunity to develop an “on-the-fly” therapy.

As they analyzed the genes of one boy who had died from the newly-discovered blood disorder, the team’s findings allowed them to help save the life of his infant sister, who was also born with the same genetic mutation. The results were recently reported in Cell.

“We had a unique opportunity here to do research, and turn it back to a patient right away,” says Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, the paper’s co-corresponding author and a principal investigator at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. “It’s incredibly rewarding to be able to bring research full circle to impact a patient’s life.”

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BCL11A-based gene therapy for sickle cell disease passes key preclinical test

sickle cell gene therapy coming
(unsplash/Pixabay)

Research going back to the 1980s has shown that sickle cell disease is milder in people whose red blood cells carry a fetal form of hemoglobin. The healthy fetal hemoglobin compensates for the mutated “adult” hemoglobin that makes red blood cells stiffen and assume the classic “sickle” shape.

Normally, fetal hemoglobin production tails off after birth, shut down by a gene called BCL11A. In 2008, researchers Stuart Orkin, MD, and Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center showed that suppressing BCL11A could restart fetal hemoglobin production; in 2011, using this approach, they corrected sickle cell disease in mice.

Now, the decades-old discovery is finally nearly ready for human testing — in the form of gene therapy. Today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s researchers report that a precision-engineered gene therapy vector suppressing BCL11A production overcame a key technical hurdle.

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Tool helps interpret subtle DNA variants from genome-wide association studies

Genome-wide association studies are huge undertakings that compare the genomes of large populations. They can turn up thousands to tens of thousands of genetic variants associated with disease. But which GWAS variants really matter?

That question becomes exponentially harder when the variants lie in the vast stretches of DNA that don’t encode proteins, but instead have regulatory functions.

“It’s hard to know which hits are causal hits, and which are just going along for the ride,” says Vijay Sankaran, MD, PhD, a pediatric hematologist/oncologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and an associate member of the Broad Institute.

Reporting in Cell, Sankaran’s team and two other groups at the Broad Institute describe a new tool that can looks at hundreds of thousands of genetic elements at once to pinpoint variants that truly affect gene expression or function. Called the massively parallel reporter assay (MPRA), it could help reveal subtle genetic influences on diseases and traits.

In Sankaran’s case, the MPRA is helping him understand how common variants contribute to blood disorders in children. “Most of the common variation is just tuning genetic function,” he says. “Just slightly, not turning it on or off, but actually just tuning it like a dimmer switch.”

The above video explains how the assay works – via DNA “barcodes.” Read more on the Broad Institute’s blog, Broad Minded.

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Hematologist Vijay Sankaran receives Boston Children’s Hospital Rising Star Award

Awards-8

Before an audience of several hundred luncheon attendees, physician-scientist Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD, received Boston Children’s Hospital’s 2015 Rising Star Award — recognizing the outstanding achievements of an up-and-coming innovator under the age of 45 in pediatric health care.

Sankaran, a board-certified pediatric hematologist/oncologist with Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, conducts innovative research on red blood cell disorders such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia, sickle cell disease and thalassemia.

The Rising Star Award and companion Lifetime Impact Award ceremony were held at the hospital’s Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards on November 10.

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Gene sifting for gene snipping: GWAS as a source of gene editing targets

Magnifying glass people GWAS gene editing
(Digital Storm/Shutterstock)

When genome-wide association studies (GWAS) first started appearing 10 years ago, they were heralded as the answer to connecting human genetic variation to human disease. These kinds of studies—which sift population-level genetic data—have revealed thousands of genetic variations associated with diseases, from age-related macular degeneration to obesity to diabetes.

However, thus far GWAS have largely come up short when it comes to finding new therapies. Few significant drug targets have come to light based on GWAS data (though some studies suggest that these studies could help drug makers find new uses for existing molecules).

Part of the problem may be that, until now, the right tools haven’t been available to exploit GWAS data. But a few recent studies—including two out of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—have used GWAS data to identify therapeutically promising targets, and then manipulated those targets using the growing arsenal of gene editing methods.

Does this mean that GWAS’ day has finally come?

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