Stories about: Viviane Nasr

Stick-on respiratory monitor allows early detection of breathing problems

Toddler wearing ExSpiron respiratory monitor
A mock-up of the ExSpiron monitoring a toddler’s breathing

Children can be at risk for compromised breathing after surgery or from conditions like asthma, congestive heart failure or sleep apnea. Opioid therapy and sedation for medical procedures can also depress breathing. Unless a child is sick enough to have a breathing tube, respiratory problems can be difficult to detect early. Yet early detection can mean the difference between life and death.

“There is currently no real-time objective measure,” says Viviane Nasr, MD, an anesthesiologist with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Cardiac Anesthesia. “Instead, respiratory assessment relies on oximetry data, a late indicator of respiratory decline, and on subjective clinical assessment.”

A new device, recently cleared by the FDA for children 1 year and older in medical settings, provides an easy, noninvasive way to tell how much air the lungs are receiving in real time. It can signal problems as much as 15-30 minutes before standard pulse oximetry picks up low blood oxygenation, according to one study.

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