Stories about: What we’ve been reading

What we’ve been reading: Week of May 4, 2015

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Apple Has Plans for Your DNA (MIT Technology Review)
Apple is collaborating with U.S. researchers to help launch apps that would offer iPhone owners the chance to get their DNA tested.

Why Your Future Vaccination Might Not Be A Shot (NPR)
Mark Prausnitz – a professor at Georgia Teach – is collaborating with the CDC and a group at Emory University to create an “ouchless” bandage-like vaccine.

Splice of life (Nature)
In light of the recent news that Chinese scientists genetically modified human embryos, the author calls for transparent discussions on the risks and ethics of editing human embryos.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of April 27, 2015

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Crowdfunded science is here. But is it legit science? (Wired)
More and more scientists are turning to crowdfunding to pay for research. Is it the end of science as we know it or a meaningful and realistic evolution?

The world’s top 10 most innovative companies of 2015 in robotics (Fast Company)
Medical applications are well-represented in this compendium of companies working on the world of tomorrow today.

What Uber drivers can teach health care (KevinMD.com)
Doctors can learn from enterprising and fiercely independent Uber drivers.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of April 6, 2015

What we've been readingExome sequencing comes to the clinic (JAMA)
An approachable and thorough summary of the growing trend, describing the ways in which sequencing can help provide a diagnosis, the diagnostic yield (as high as 40 percent or more, depending on the population), how often the results have changed treatment decisions and the question of who pays.

Who Owns CRISPR? (The Scientist)
Excellent coverage of the escalating patent scramble for genome editing.

Doctors Make House Calls On Tablets Carried By Houston Firefighters (NPR)
Interesting use of telemedicine in Houston, where many people call 911 in non-emergency situations. EMTs carry tablets, and can have callers chat with a physician on a video app, avoiding the need to take them to the ED.

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What we’ve been reading: Week of February 9, 2015

Children what we've been reading Flickr thomaslife https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomaslife/4508639159
(Photo: thomaslife/Flickr)

Vector’s picks of recent pediatric healthcare, science and innovation news.

Encryption wouldn’t have stopped Anthem’s data breach (MIT Technology Review)
Hackers got their hands on the personal information and Social Security numbers of 80 million people when they broke into the network of health insurer Anthem health. But encryption alone wouldn’t have been enough to keep those data safe.

Could a wireless pacemaker let hackers take control of your heart? (Science)
Medical devices like pacemakers, insulin pumps and defibrillators are getting ever smaller and more wirelessly connected. But are those connections secure enough?

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