Stories about: Information technology

What we’ve been reading: Week of May 18, 2015

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From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare (MedCity News)
Why does Twitter care about the healthcare industry? Craig Hashi, one of two Twitter engineers dedicated to healthcare, details the opportunities.

MIT’s implantable device could help docs determine best cancer medicine (Boston Business Journal)
Removing the trial and error associated with cancer drug treatments is high on oncologists’ wish lists. Heeding that call, MIT has developed an implantable device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can carry up to 30 different drug doses to a cancerous tumor, and then be removed to test responses.

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Bringing CLARITY to families with undiagnosed disease

sick child-Shutterstock-croppedIn the U.S. alone, an estimated 30 million Americans suffer from a rare disorder. Many of them never receive a diagnosis, and often find themselves on a lonely journey, going from doctor to doctor and test to test, sometimes for many years, with no explanation for their symptoms.

How many people fall in the “undiagnosed” category is unclear, but in its first six years, the NIH’s Undiagnosed Diseases Program has received more than 10,000 inquiries. Without a diagnosis, it’s often difficult to qualify for insurance coverage, receive coordinated care or even connect with a support group.

What if the work of solving these medical mysteries could be crowd-sourced? That’s the goal of CLARITY Undiagnosed, an international challenge launching today in which scientific teams can compete to provide answers for five families with undiagnosed conditions. (Deadline for applications: June 11).

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Is that fever a problem? Ask Thermia

Thermia fever calculator HealthMap

Your child’s forehead is warm, and you just took her temperature. The next question is, what to do about it? We all know that an average normal temp is 98.6°F, but is 100° a problem? Should 102° be a concern?

This is where Thermia comes in. It’s an online fever calculator developed by the HealthMap team at Boston Children’s Hospital. Essentially, it’s an educational tool aimed at helping concerned parents interpret a child’s temperature and understand which steps they should consider taking.

“I’m a father of two, and I still wonder sometimes what a temperature actually means,” says HealthMap co-founder John Brownstein, PhD. “We realized that there really aren’t any fever calculators out there to help parents answer that question.

“Our idea with Thermia,” he adds, “was to arm families with information so they don’t panic when their child has a temperature.”

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Bioinformatics, big data and putting the ‘count’ in accountable care

Tally_marks_counting_visitors-Wikimedia CommonsWhen you go into Netflix to choose a movie or Amazon to buy a book, they’re ready with proactive suggestions for your next purchase, based on your past history. Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, would like to see something similar happening in medicine, where today, patients often find themselves repeating their medical history “again and again to every provider,” as Kohane recently told Harvard Medicine.

“Medicine as a whole is a knowledge-processing business that increasingly is taking large amounts of data and then, in theory, bringing that information to the point of care so that doctor and patient have a maximally informed visit,” says Kohane, chair of informatics at Boston Children’s Hospital and co-director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School.

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RNSafe: Remote video checks of bedside drug dosing

RNSafe-Bunker nurse view Screenshot_2015-04-16-10-31-32When a nurse gives a complex medication at the bedside, a second nurse must come in to observe and verify the dose. But flagging down a nurse on a busy hospital floor can be pretty challenging, especially when the nurse has to “suit up” because of infection control precautions in the patient’s room. During a Nursing Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) Conference at Boston Children’s Hospital, a group of nurses expressed concern that this arrangement could potentially jeopardize safety. “We thought we should be able to do better,” says project co-developer Jennifer Taylor, MSEd, BSN, RN-BC, CPN.

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Boston Children’s to host second annual Innovators’ Showcase

Ten or more monitors keep track of every child in the ICU. How can clinicians manage all the data they provide?  Surgical Sam beating heart pediatric trainer mannequin simulation Simulator Program The Chamberlain GroupA prototype of the warming pad. The white color indicates that the pad's "phase-change" material is in its solid state. (Courtesy of Anne Hansen)Silk worms could create tissues needed for urinary tract reconstruction.

 

(Clockwise from top: T3, Surgical Sam, non-electric baby warmer, silk-based organ reconstruction)

Next week—on April 15—Boston-area visitors can sample inventions and technologies from around Boston Children’s Hospital, some in development and some already in use. More than 20 medical innovations will be on display in an interactive “science fair” format. We’ll be demonstrating a variety of medical devices, mobile applications, software IT innovations, wearables and bioengineering innovations. It’s free and open to the public.

The event is hosted by Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program and Technology & Innovation Development Office, from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by networking time (4 to 5 p.m.).

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What we’ve been reading: Week of March 30, 2015

shutterstock_175074977Bubble wrap used for cheap blood and bacteria tests (New Scientist)
Snap, crackle, pop are the familiar sounds of bubble wrap. According to George Whitesides at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the cheap packing material may be popping up in the near future as a diagnostic tool, replacing costlier 96-well plates.

Nearly half of all pre-schoolers with ADHD are on medication (Washington Post)
The American Academy of Pediatrics calls for children under 6 with ADHD to engage in behavioral therapy before taking medication. Yet according to a national survey published in the Journal of Pediatrics, nearly half of preschool-aged children are on medication for the condition, and more than a fifth were receiving neither of the recommended therapies.

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Show me the money: Reimbursement for medical innovations

medical device reimbursementDevice developers tend to focus on the FDA approval process—PMAs and 510(k) clearances—while overlooking another major challenge: getting insurers to cover the device. Before approaching investors, and certainly before doing any studies, keep payers in mind, advises Maren Anderson, president of MDA Consulting, Inc., which specializes in reimbursement planning.

In the old days, doctors prescribed, and insurers paid. Under health care reform, that’s changed, says Anderson.

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A biomarker for Rett syndrome: Measuring hand movements

Rett syndrome stereotypies bracelet Q-sensor curveRett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting mostly girls, takes away the ability to speak, and this makes the condition hard to reliably measure and assess. But children with Rett syndrome also display distinctive hand movements or stereotypies, including hand wringing, clasping and other repetitive hand movements, visible in many of these videos. With help from a grant from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Innovation Acceleration Program, researchers are transforming these hand movements into an assessment tool.

Until now, there has been no quantitative measure for monitoring Rett hand movements. Adapting commercially available wearable sensor technology, biomedical engineering researcher Heather O’Leary has created a bracelet-like device not unlike Fitbit, another wearable accelerometer used to monitor exercise activity levels.

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Meet Huggable, the robotic teddy bear designed for sick kids

Nobody likes being confined to a hospital bed. Children especially can feel lonely, bored or scared in these situations. Hours feel like days, and they may not be able to fully understand or describe why they are there.

Child life specialists have long understood that tapping into playtime can bring up information about a child’s social and emotional needs that might not be revealed in more structured clinical assessments. But what if you cannot physically be in the room?

Deirdre Logan, PhD, Director of Psychology Services in Pain Medicine, and Peter Weinstock, MD, PhD, Director of the Boston Children’s Simulator Program (SIMPeds), may have found the answer. Along with a dedicated, multidisciplinary research team from Boston Children’s, MIT’s Media Lab, and Northeastern University, they have designed a robotic teddy bear that may be able to supplement care team interactions on inpatient units.

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