Stories about: Pediatrics

Acetaminophen does not aggravate young children’s asthma

asthma
A head-to-head comparison with ibuprofen refutes a link between acetaminophen and asthma exacerbations.

Your toddler is screaming in pain. Her forehead is burning. You rush to your local drugstore. What do you get — Tylenol or Motrin? And by the way, she also has asthma.

Recently, many parents have been under the impression that acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc.) may do more harm than good in young children with asthma.

“There’s been a lot of ‘smoke’ about this, based on a lot of retrospective observational data,” says Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Allergy and Immunology.

The studies in question concluded that the common over-the-counter remedy can cause asthma exacerbations. Reviewing these studies, one author concluded, “Until future studies document the safety of this drug, children with asthma or at risk for asthma should avoid the use of acetaminophen.”

The Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen in Children with Asthma (AVICA) trial, led by Phipatanakul for the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s AsthmaNet now sets the record straight.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

More clinical trials in kids? Nearly half are unfinished or unpublished

pediatric trials clinical trials
Of 559 interventional trials in children, 19 percent were stopped early and 30 percent of completed trials remained unpublished several years later, finds a new study. (Vmenkov/Wikimedia Commons)

Recent laws like the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and the Pediatric Research Equity Act are encouraging clinical trials in children. Yet, as with adult trials, these trials commonly stall out or, if completed, remain unpublished several years later, finds a study published online today in Pediatrics.

“Our findings may speak to how commonplace discontinuation and non-publication are in medical research in general,” says Natalie Pica, MD, PhD, a senior resident at Boston Children’s Hospital and the study’s coauthor. “We need to make sure that when children participate in clinical trials, their efforts are contributing to broader scientific knowledge.”

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Can asthma be nipped in the bud?

asthma
A multicenter randomized trial is testing omalizumab (Xolair) in wheezy toddlers. (FDA/Wikimedia Commons)

Worldwide, asthma affects an estimated 300 million people, and is expected to surpass 400 million by 2025, according to the World Health Organization. About 1 in 10 U.S. children have asthma, and research shows that the vast majority of them also have allergy. Could that provide a clue to its prevention?

Starting at 2 to 3 years of age, susceptible children start to become sensitized to pollens, mold spores and other airborne allergens. They begin to produce IgE antibodies, which not only trigger allergic reactions but also impair their anti-viral immune responses — potentially leading to more viral infections that can further hasten their progression to asthma.

A multicenter clinical trial, led by Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, of the Division of Allergy & Immunology at Boston Children’s Hospital, now aims to test whether the anti-IgE drug omalizumab (Xolair) can short-circuit this process.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

News Notes: Pediatric science roundup

A quick look at recent research Vector finds noteworthy.

Tracking infants’ microbiomes

cute microbes-shutterstock_317080235-croppedMicrobiome studies are blooming as rapidly as bacteria in an immunocompromised host. But few studies have been done in children, whose microbiomes are actively forming and vulnerable to outside influences. Two studies in Science Translational Medicine on June 15 tracked infants’ gut microbiomes prospectively over time. The first, led by researchers at the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital, analyzed DNA from monthly stool samples from 39 Finnish infants, starting at 2 months of age. Over the next three years, 20 of the children received at least one course of antibiotics. Those who were repeatedly dosed had fewer “good” bacteria, including microbes important in training the immune system. Overall, their microbiomes were less diverse and less stable, and their gut microbes had more antibiotic resistance genes, some of which lingered even after antibiotic treatment. Delivery mode (cesarean vs. vaginal) also affected microbial diversity. A second study at NYU Langone Medical Center tracked 43 U.S. infants for two years and similarly found disturbances in microbiome development associated with antibiotic treatment, delivery by cesarean section and formula feeding versus breastfeeding.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Stem cells and birth defects: Could gastroschisis be treated in utero?

gastroschisis birth defects
Although Gianna was treated surgically, Dario Fauza, MD, hopes to someday use stem cells from the amniotic fluid, multiplied and returned to the womb, to naturally heal gastroschisis and other birth defects. (Courtesy Danielle DeCarlo)

Except when spreading awareness about her condition, 6-year-old Gianna DeCarlo prefers not to wear two-piece bathing suits because of the long vertical scar on her stomach. “Even though nobody’s said anything, she feels like she’ll be made fun of,” says her mother, Danielle. “I do what I can to make her love her body.”

Gianna doesn’t remember her three surgeries or the nasogastric tube she needed as an infant, before she was able to eat normally. She was born with gastroschisis, a striking birth defect in which the abdominal wall doesn’t seal fully during fetal development. As a result, her intestines developed outside her body. She was fed through an IV for several weeks, and was finally stitched fully shut at age 2.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Expectation vs. reality: Rare disease parents’ mixed feelings about genetic research results

rare disease genetic resultsTypically, when you enroll in a study, it’s not with the expectation that you will receive results. In genomics studies, it’s becoming common to give families the option to get individual results — the newborn sequencing study, Baby Seq, is just one example — as an incentive to participate. Families of children with rare disease, especially undiagnosed illnesses, need no incentive: they’re desperate for answers.

But how do families actually feel once they get genetic results? We conducted interviews with nine rare disease parents (six mothers, three fathers) whose children were enrolled at the hospital’s Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research. What we found is more complexity than we expected.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Making ‘simple’ heart surgery simpler, with minimally invasive techniques

minimally invasive heart surgeryTertiary care centers such as the Boston Children’s Hospital Heart Center have led the way in groundbreaking surgical innovations for years, pushing boundaries and correcting ever more complex abnormalities.

But innovation is also making a difference when it comes to more “common” procedures.

“We’re always trying to make the less complex procedures shorter and less invasive,” says Sitaram Emani, MD, director of the Complex Biventricular Repair Program at the Heart Center. “Making surgery and recovery less painful and disruptive for all of our patients is a priority.”

Emani and his fellow cardiac surgeons have pioneered a minimally-invasive “scope” approach, repairing a host of common problems normally requiring open-heart surgery — including ventricular septal defects, atrial septal defects, tetralogy of fallot, aortic valve defects, vascular rings and patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) — through small incisions.

The new method not only decreases pain discomfort, and scarring, but also gets patients in and out of the hospital in half the time.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Medicine meets theater: Pediatrics training, parent practice, device innovation ‘on location’

medical simulation

Pediatric medicine just took a step for the better in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area with a new, expanded pediatric Simulation (SIM) Center — a dedicated space where doctors, nurses and other staff can rehearse tough medical situations or practice tricky or rare procedures in a clinical setting that looks and feels real.

But clinicians aren’t the only ones who will be using the new 4,000-square-foot facility, which incorporates real medical equipment, set design and special effects.

Families can get hands-on practice with medical equipment they’ll be using at home. Inventors and “hackers” can develop and test new devices or software platforms and see how they perform in a life-like clinical environment. Planned hacks, for example, will explore different medical and surgical applications for voice-activated and gesture-controlled devices.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

The face of telehealth: Serving children in health care “deserts”

pediatric telehealthAt least 15 million children reside in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) that average fewer than one health professional for every 3,500 people. In these health care deserts, time and transportation barriers prevent even children with health insurance have trouble getting timely care, particularly specialty care. Children in poor, rural areas are most at risk.

So health problems fester and get worse — and more expensive when finally addressed.

Telehealth can solve many of these problems. Through remote video/voice/data connections, dermatologists can view images of rashes and moles sent by primary care providers; cardiologists can patch into local emergency rooms and listen to heart sounds and read EKG tracings; critical care physicians and neonatologists can see and hear newborns in distress, listen to lung sounds, read their vital signs and view images. They can advise local clinicians and guide them through next steps.

However, pediatric telehealth hasn’t been adopted as widely as it could be. A white paper presented by the Children’s Health Fund at a Congressional briefing last week enumerated the obstacles:

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Probing the link between autism, GI disorders and the microbiome

autism microbiome
(Dubova/Shutterstock)

Sonia A. Ballal is an attending physician in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Eleven-year-old Lyle has autism and doesn’t speak, but his mother is used to reading his nonverbal cues. He prefers a routine, but has always been a generally cheerful child who enjoys school and playing with his little sister.

Several weeks before I met Lyle (not his real name), his mother observed a dramatic shift. He was agitated, at times hitting his head against the wall, not receiving his typical sunny reports from school.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment